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Friday, 12 February 2016

3 Ways To Avoid App Rejected For Being Too Simple


If you developed an app for a Board Game or Augmented Reality Game you would he probably stuck into the App Rejected because it's too simple. The problem is that this is the users expect from this kind of apps... a point counter cannot be too complicated!

You cannot blame Apple because they get no direct revenue from your app. Probably your app is free if necessary for the game. Maybe the game requires to buy a physical game and they get no cut on it! Don't worry, I will explain you the problems I have found while uploading apps for our games like ROAR! and we will see how to solve the rejection! :)


Like always, you can read the original post from Rombo Games original Development Blog here!


Problem number 1:

2.12: Apps that are not very useful, are simply web sites bundled as apps, or do not provide any lasting entertainment value may be rejected.


Problem number 2:

11.16: Apps may enable additional approved features or functionality when used in combination with specific approved physical products (such as a toy) as long as the additional features and functionality are either completely dependent on such hardware (for example an App that is used to control a telescope) or also available through the App without the physical products, such as by way of reward for achievement or by use of IAP


The list of reasons why your app may be rejected is HUGE! It's also very subjective, so you may be luckier with another reviewer ;)


Solution number 1:

Include the manual of your game inside the app!
This is a good idea that you should do even if Apple would not force you! It's a fantastic way of having easy correction of the rules and possibility of future localization!


Solution number 2:

Add a link to the Print and Play or Shop where to buy your game!
Again, this is pretty logical! People may find your app on the store and it would be great for them to give your game a try before buying it on the shop if possible! Also reviewers will be able to properly check the game.


Solution number 3:

Make sure don't make blockers inside the app!
This is the trickiest one... it means that if your app cannot work without physical components let the users (and reviewers) experience this necessity directly. For example they can see the camera waiting for scanning of the board. If you block access to this functionality via QR or other kind of codes Apple will require that you give the choice for the players to unlock this via In-App purchases. This doesn't make sense for Board or Augmented Reality Games and will just make things confusing!


Remember! It's all about treating your app more than a tool, but something really useful and enjoyable for your players! :)

1 comment:

  1. Heya!
    Have faced rejections in submitting applications on Play store. This article sure helps in getting it all right to submit a Unity Game Engine Application or Game. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete